Art and Activism: 1930s and Today

Art Hazelwood

Paul Boden
Organizing Director, Western Regional Advocacy Project
and 
Art Hazelwood 
author of Hobos to Street People

Can political art change the world? It's a question that political artists often ask, sometimes in frustration and sometimes in despair.

History and current examples show that it can. By itself art cannot change everything, but its effect can be profound. From the Great Depression to present day, art has been a powerful catalyst for advocacy, for building solidarity, and for preserving a history often suppressed in the mainstream.

Read the whole article at Huffington Post here
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-boden/art-activism-1930s-today_b_1098260.html

 

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About Art Hazelwood

Some Information

Art Hazelwood artist, impresario and instigator lives in San Francisco. He tries to integrate being an artist with curating and political activism.

He completed two ceramic tile murals in 2009, one, a memorial to Arnett Watson, a homeless rights activist, the other in a program to aid children of incarcerated parents at Visitacion Valley Middle School in San Francisco. His show of prints, Hubris Corpulentus, about the current US wars, traveled to several venues around the country from 2003 to 2006. He created three large scale book projects with print publisher Eastside Editions in San Francisco. Each of these book projects took two years to complete. His prints are in several public collections including the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York Public Library, Library of Congress, RSDI Museum, Stanford Special Collections Library, Yale Special Collections Library.

Since 1993 he has worked with several homeless rights organizations creating artwork for street newspapers, creating posters and helping to organize fundraising events.

In 2009 he curated three major exhibitions. The first, a three year traveling exhibition which examines artists’ responses to homelessness from the New Deal to the present, opened at the California Historical Society in San Francisco. He also curated a history of the relief print in Northern California; nearly one hundred woodcuts, linocuts and wood engravings over a one hundred year span, at the Hearst Art Gallery, St. Mary’s College in Moraga, California. And he curated a retrospective of slain artist Casper Banjo at the Mission Cultural Center in San Francisco.

In 2008, together with Stephen Fredericks of the New York Society of Etchers, he organized the Art of Democracy a national coalition, producing more than one hundred political posters and bringing together more than fifty political art shows taking place all over the country leading up to the presidential elections. He has organized more than 20 group exhibitions and curated shows for individual artists including retrospectives of several artists including William Wolff, Roy Ragle, Casper Banjo, David Avery, Frank Rowe and Richard Correll (a two person show) and Patricia Cosper Brandes.